Want to know if you have experience developing a restful API [overlapping]

Asked 2 months ago, Updated 2 months ago, 8 views

Two years ago

What are the ways and points to determine if you have experience creating a Restful API?
I have made the API itself in practice, but I would like to know how to check if it is Restful.
This is how to check if it is Restful for non-Restful APIs.It doesn't matter if it's a small point of view, but a rough point of view.

As one hypothesis, "experience in creating APIs that operate with HTTP methods such as GET, POST, PUT, DELETE" is one of the criteria for creating a Restful API.

api rest

2022-09-30 11:02

1 Answers

I have made the API itself in practice, but I would like to know how to check if it is Restful.

Probably not. (No one but yourself can judge what your own specifications are unless you provide detailed specifications, but you can't easily disclose detailed specifications of what you made in practice, so you want to know the criteria.)

I wrote that I probably don't have one, but maybe I do.

In other words, the answer may be "none" or "none."

A possible way to make a decision is if you say that the framework itself is RESTful in your framework manual or something (or if you have created an API that follows the REST principle, you may say you have experience, but you can't because you're asking these questions).

Rails Routing-Rails Guide

The Rails guide above shows how to make it in RESTful.

In this case, it would be RESTful if you were developing using Rails manners (but I don't know if all the engineers in the world recognize Rails' API creation as RESTful).It probably follows the REST principle, but maybe someone will notice a omission or start discussing it.)Failure to follow the rules may result in RESTful.

As one hypothesis, "experience in creating APIs that operate with HTTP methods such as GET, POST, PUT, DELETE" is one of the criteria for creating a Restful API.

If you use GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, some people may say RESTful, but it probably won't work.

In the first place, RESTful follows the REST principle.Representational State Transfer-Wikipedia information, but

  • Stateless Client/Server Protocol
  • A set of well-defined operations that can be applied to all information (resources)
  • Unique syntax for uniquely identifying resources
  • Use hypermedia to handle both application information and state transitions

According to the above principles, it is RESTful. The HTTP method applies to the "set of well-defined operations" of the above principles that apply to all information (resources).
Nothing seems to be restricted to HTTP methods, and even HTTP methods are part of the principle.

If you are calling yourself RESTful, the concept of resource is important, as the word resource is often described in the Rails guide.
However, there seems to be a discussion about resource operation.

Also on Representational State Transfer-Wikipedia

In fact, however, these resource manipulations are the subject of discussion.Some people say that distinguishing between "resource" and "expression" is too ideological.In RDF communities, however, resource and representation distinctions are common.

It says something a little complicated.

(This paragraph is a side note) I have tried to do more with GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, but the HTML that I can use with my browser has not supported PUT and DELETE for a long time.For this reason, Rails and Spring create forms that look like PUT and DELETE transmissions with a little hack (?).However, I think Spring has given up on PUT and DELETE due to the recent version upgrade.The reason why I think I've given up is because I can't use PUT and DELETE by default when I upgrade the version as you can see in here or hereThat's why if you hit the API directly instead of HTML, you won't have this problem, but you can't ignore browsers that occupy a lot of the web.

Now, again, what matters in RESTful is the resource (although it seems to have been discussed).
HTTP methods such as GET, POST, PUT, DELETE should probably be considered a subposition (although resource is part of the principle). Since HTTP methods are used to manipulate resource, I think the concept is RESTful.>

Finally, this question is "Is the API that you use HTTP methods such as GET, POST, PUT, DELETE RESTful?" If so, I think it would be a good question for stack overflow because the answer could be YES or NO (this time, NO) (although some other information may be RESTful, so it may not be the right question yet).I mainly cover HTTP methods, and only HTTP methods answered RESTful.


2022-09-30 11:02

If you have any answers or tips


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